5430866_lookbookss
Quoted from lookbook.nu

Read More

I met Viva when I took a photography class with her at Goldsmiths College in London, and from the first moment, I knew there was something special about her.  Therefore it makes me so happy to see that she’s followed her talent and that her work has already been exhibited many different places. Here’s a short interview with her, and if you want to see more, check out her work here

Name: Viva Antonia Meyer
Age: 31
Occupation: Photographer
Currently living in: Berlin

What makes you happy?

Working… Doing photography projects makes me really happy.

Where do you find inspiration?

Often in movies, old and new. But what really helps when I don’t have ideas is to just do something, take a picture or play with Photoshop.

When did you realise that you were going to be a photographer?

Quite late although photographing was always something I did. To say “I am a photographer” took some time, probably not until I started my Photography and Media Art studies in London. I am still both: a photographer and a copywriter.

How do you begin a new project?

Sometimes I do research, but mostly I just try to do something. So that can be anything from walking outside with a camera, asking people to model or – like last year – booking a trip to São Paulo.

Where’s your favourite place to work from?

I highly enjoy being by myself in new surroundings. In my current photography project I’m visiting cities for the first time and documenting what I see with my camera. All the other times I love working from my studio in Berlin.






Describe an experience you had, that confirmed you, why you are doing what you do.

I think it was more a feeling than a concrete experience. When I was working full time as a copywriter in an ad agency I started to miss making pictures very badly. I still love writing probably as much as photography, but with images I can do something without having to “explain” too much and show something that is really “me”.






Name one person who helped you get to where you are today.

My mum – of course! She is a photographer and it was surely inspirational for me to grow up with her black and white self-printed-in-her-own-darkroom photography.

What does photography/art mean to you?

Taking photos and making pictures means feeling at home and being pushed further at the same time. It’s a feeling that drives me with no chance of getting too comfortable. In fact, if I don’t work, I find myself very frustrated. And then, if something I felt like I should do is done and I actually like it – then that is the best feeling in the world.

Name one woman who inspired you on your creative journey?

My friend Ricarda Messner always motivated me with her energy and fun ideas. She was my first favourite model for my pictures and now she inspires me as publisher and artist herself.

Which challenges have you met in your work?

Sometimes I look on Instagram and think: why should I take any more pictures? Too much good and bad stuff is already there.

Which advice would you give to an aspiring photographer?

Try digital and analogue. Don’t take yourself too seriously.

See more of Viva’s work here.

Read More

Name: Sabina Carrano
Age: 38
Occupation: As Seen by Her – A platform to motivate and support women, aiming to move away from a culture of competition and towards one of compassion.
Currently living in: Stockholm

What makes you happy?

Routines are necessary to keep me grounded, but spontaneously is how I prefer to live my life. But I’m also a creature of habit and quite easy to please; returning to my favourite place for coffee in the morning or walking to the fleamarket every Sunday, having lunch at my local bistro on the way back home. Other than traveling, good food and drinks, family both biological and extended makes me happy. As much as I need to be alone a lot, togetherness gives me a great sence of affinity. Other things that make me happy is; well assorted supermarkets, spring and autumn, traditions, my animal Snoop Dog, reading, walking, running, nature, water and museums.

Where do you find inspiration?

I recently moved country and I have realized that where I live is one of my main inspirations. People, places, architecture, nature and just the general feeling of a city is crucial to me, or I loose energy. I lived under a blue sky almost every day for the last three years, the sun inspires me to go out and it gives me the energy to go through with almost anything I want or wish to do. I’m very weak for female literature and art (both artists and objects), and I follow, know, read about and listen to, a lot of inspiring women. ASBH has made it easier for me to get in contact with women that inspire me and I’m very happy about that.

When did you realise that you were going to start As Seen By Her?

When I was 17 years old I had a car accident, a girl I didn’t know that had an accident a few years earlier heard about it, and she contacted me. She asked me if I wanted to talk to her about it, and eventually also if I wanted to share my story in schools and youth clubs to prevent drinking and driving. I said yes to both and really learned then, what sharing your experiences can do for yourself and others. I have a passion for biographies and documentaries and I believe that meaningful meetings (wether in person or not) can be very helpful in terms of understanding and feeling understood. Every person you meet have a story to tell, and even though ASBH is quite new, I’ve believed for a long time that if we share our stories, we can help each other a lot.

How do you begin a new project?

I actually try to not get too excited and carried away. As I work mostly on my own I don’t have anyone, initially at least, that can bring me back when I get off track. And in order to get productive I need to separate the creativity, excitement and ideas before moving on realistically.

Where’s your favourite place to work from?

It depends what kind of work it is. If I need to write something I usually work from home, I need it to be quiet or I can’t think. I have this romantic idea of working in a cafe’, but reality is I wouldn’t be able to, as I’ve got a wandering mind and there’s too much going on around me. When working with others I don’t mind doing it over a glass of wine.

Describe a normal workday.

I’m very good at procrastinating so no days are the same. It also depends what mood I’m in, the weather and what’s going on around me. But I’d say a normal day starts with good intentions and a great deal of planning.

Describe an experience you had, that confirmed you, why you are doing what you do.

I’m working on a project with a friend and photographer and we visited a woman in her home and studio in Barcelona; I left hours later filled with energy, and could literally not stop talking about it for days.
She inspired me so much on a creative, visual and intellectual level and that confirmed how much I enjoy doing this. I also find it extremly inspiring and rewarding to read and share personal stories. You’d be surprised how many women want to talk about their experiences (both good and bad) if you actually ask them about it. It’s supporting them as well as the people reading it (that are maybe going through the same thing.)

Name one person who helped you get to where you are today.

Well, I did. I helped myself and I’m very proud of that. But also and even more so, the women that trusted me to share their stories. Every woman I’ve met along the way or that supported and helped me has a big role in this experience, and they’ve helped me shape and outline what ASBH is. My friend Kristen has supported me with a lot of knowledge and has definitely been an inspiration when it comes to fearlessness and believing in yourself. She’s always supported my ideas, considered my weaknesses as well as my strenghts, which only someone that really knows you can do. I love her for her honesty. My friend Andrea has helped me a lot with the graphic side of ASBH and my website. She’s been very supportive with her patience and she’s one of the most non judgmental people I know which makes her someone I trust very much. She was my first interview, and has been an important part of ASBH ever since. I also have to mention my ex-boyfriend Danny, he supported me from the very beginning, pushing me to believe in this and has endlessly been listening to all my ideas, reflections, thoughts and questions. I’ve met so many friends and inspiring women through this and they’ve helped me with events and projects, they’ve flewn to Barcelona from around Europe to support me, they’ve helped to put my ideas into words when my english wasn’t enough and inspired, enlightened and thought me so much about female friendships and womenhood.

What does feminism mean to you?

I didn’t realize how hard this question would be to answer in writing, and not in person. Also, where to start Feminism to me means social, political and economic equality of the sexes. I personally feel very strongly about the social aspect; how women are perceived, in general but especially sexually and emotionally. Politically and historically; female human rights and the oppression of women around the world. The freedom to decide over our own life and bodies, abortion laws and justice for rape, trafficking and domestic violence victims to mention a few.

Name one women who inspired you on your creative journey.

I have always been inspired by Frida Kahlo for obvious reasons, and Nina Simone and Joan Didion because of how they expresses themselves (both with words and their bodies). To name one woman is impossible, but I have to say that as much as I’m inspired by women from the past (a lot) I do love the brave women I have around me, that I can talk to, therefore relate to and be inspired by.

Which challenges have you met in your work?

I didn’t have a plan or a specific goal when I started ASBH, other than to talk to women and share their stories. I also don’t have any previous experience of work like this and as much as I’m really enjoying it, I do find it challenging sometimes. One of the bigger challenges is to not let myself get affected when a story I feel strongly about doesn’t get enough attention (i.e likes on Instagram, as that’s where I can see most of the feedback). I really respect these women and the fact that they share their life stories with me and everyone else that reads them, I feel like I owe them all the support and understanding. It’s problematic when only certain women and/or topics are represented, or get likes or followers on social media. Usually based on looks, trends, ’fame’ and/or followers. I have been suggested who and what to show on ASBH, in order to get more likes and followers, and to get certain people interested in participating. This doesn’t interest me at all, I’m interested in most people but not one or the other.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

There is a quote from one of my favourite poets Nayyirah Waheed, and it’s something I think would have calmed me as a young girl and woman; ‘Give in. To your uniqueness. The very thing you’ve been fighting not to be your whole life. Is the very thing that is your genius’.

Read More

Name: Sabina Carrano
Age: 38
Occupation: As Seen by Her – A platform to motivate and support women, aiming to move away from a culture of competition and towards one of compassion.
Currently living in: Stockholm

What makes you happy?

Routines are necessary to keep me grounded, but spontaneously is how I prefer to live my life. But I’m also a creature of habit and quite easy to please; returning to my favourite place for coffee in the morning or walking to the fleamarket every Sunday, having lunch at my local bistro on the way back home. Other than traveling, good food and drinks, family both biological and extended makes me happy. As much as I need to be alone a lot, togetherness gives me a great sence of affinity. Other things that make me happy is; well assorted supermarkets, spring and autumn, traditions, my animal Snoop Dog, reading, walking, running, nature, water and museums.

Where do you find inspiration?

I recently moved country and I have realized that where I live is one of my main inspirations. People, places, architecture, nature and just the general feeling of a city is crucial to me, or I loose energy. I lived under a blue sky almost every day for the last three years, the sun inspires me to go out and it gives me the energy to go through with almost anything I want or wish to do. I’m very weak for female literature and art (both artists and objects), and I follow, know, read about and listen to, a lot of inspiring women. ASBH has made it easier for me to get in contact with women that inspire me and I’m very happy about that.

When did you realise that you were going to start As Seen By Her?

When I was 17 years old I had a car accident, a girl I didn’t know that had an accident a few years earlier heard about it, and she contacted me. She asked me if I wanted to talk to her about it, and eventually also if I wanted to share my story in schools and youth clubs to prevent drinking and driving. I said yes to both and really learned then, what sharing your experiences can do for yourself and others. I have a passion for biographies and documentaries and I believe that meaningful meetings (wether in person or not) can be very helpful in terms of understanding and feeling understood. Every person you meet have a story to tell, and even though ASBH is quite new, I’ve believed for a long time that if we share our stories, we can help each other a lot.

How do you begin a new project?

I actually try to not get too excited and carried away. As I work mostly on my own I don’t have anyone, initially at least, that can bring me back when I get off track. And in order to get productive I need to separate the creativity, excitement and ideas before moving on realistically.

Where’s your favourite place to work from?

It depends what kind of work it is. If I need to write something I usually work from home, I need it to be quiet or I can’t think. I have this romantic idea of working in a cafe’, but reality is I wouldn’t be able to, as I’ve got a wandering mind and there’s too much going on around me. When working with others I don’t mind doing it over a glass of wine.

Describe a normal workday.

I’m very good at procrastinating so no days are the same. It also depends what mood I’m in, the weather and what’s going on around me. But I’d say a normal day starts with good intentions and a great deal of planning.

Describe an experience you had, that confirmed you, why you are doing what you do.

I’m working on a project with a friend and photographer and we visited a woman in her home and studio in Barcelona; I left hours later filled with energy, and could literally not stop talking about it for days.
She inspired me so much on a creative, visual and intellectual level and that confirmed how much I enjoy doing this. I also find it extremly inspiring and rewarding to read and share personal stories. You’d be surprised how many women want to talk about their experiences (both good and bad) if you actually ask them about it. It’s supporting them as well as the people reading it (that are maybe going through the same thing.)

Name one person who helped you get to where you are today.

Well, I did. I helped myself and I’m very proud of that. But also and even more so, the women that trusted me to share their stories. Every woman I’ve met along the way or that supported and helped me has a big role in this experience, and they’ve helped me shape and outline what ASBH is. My friend Kristen has supported me with a lot of knowledge and has definitely been an inspiration when it comes to fearlessness and believing in yourself. She’s always supported my ideas, considered my weaknesses as well as my strenghts, which only someone that really knows you can do. I love her for her honesty. My friend Andrea has helped me a lot with the graphic side of ASBH and my website. She’s been very supportive with her patience and she’s one of the most non judgmental people I know which makes her someone I trust very much. She was my first interview, and has been an important part of ASBH ever since. I also have to mention my ex-boyfriend Danny, he supported me from the very beginning, pushing me to believe in this and has endlessly been listening to all my ideas, reflections, thoughts and questions. I’ve met so many friends and inspiring women through this and they’ve helped me with events and projects, they’ve flewn to Barcelona from around Europe to support me, they’ve helped to put my ideas into words when my english wasn’t enough and inspired, enlightened and thought me so much about female friendships and womenhood.

What does feminism mean to you?

I didn’t realize how hard this question would be to answer in writing, and not in person. Also, where to start Feminism to me means social, political and economic equality of the sexes. I personally feel very strongly about the social aspect; how women are perceived, in general but especially sexually and emotionally. Politically and historically; female human rights and the oppression of women around the world. The freedom to decide over our own life and bodies, abortion laws and justice for rape, trafficking and domestic violence victims to mention a few.

Name one women who inspired you on your creative journey.

I have always been inspired by Frida Kahlo for obvious reasons, and Nina Simone and Joan Didion because of how they expresses themselves (both with words and their bodies). To name one woman is impossible, but I have to say that as much as I’m inspired by women from the past (a lot) I do love the brave women I have around me, that I can talk to, therefore relate to and be inspired by.

Which challenges have you met in your work?

I didn’t have a plan or a specific goal when I started ASBH, other than to talk to women and share their stories. I also don’t have any previous experience of work like this and as much as I’m really enjoying it, I do find it challenging sometimes. One of the bigger challenges is to not let myself get affected when a story I feel strongly about doesn’t get enough attention (i.e likes on Instagram, as that’s where I can see most of the feedback). I really respect these women and the fact that they share their life stories with me and everyone else that reads them, I feel like I owe them all the support and understanding. It’s problematic when only certain women and/or topics are represented, or get likes or followers on social media. Usually based on looks, trends, ’fame’ and/or followers. I have been suggested who and what to show on ASBH, in order to get more likes and followers, and to get certain people interested in participating. This doesn’t interest me at all, I’m interested in most people but not one or the other.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

There is a quote from one of my favourite poets Nayyirah Waheed, and it’s something I think would have calmed me as a young girl and woman; ‘Give in. To your uniqueness. The very thing you’ve been fighting not to be your whole life. Is the very thing that is your genius’.

Read More

5398388_unnamed_(1)
Quoted from lookbook.nu

Read More

5398388_unnamed_(1)
Quoted from lookbook.nu

Read More

Name: Sophie Whippy
Age: 31
Occupation: Yoga Teacher & Studio owner at Stretch, Doula / Antenatal Educator at Doula London
Currently living in: London

What makes you happy?

I would be a rubbish mum & wife if I didn’t say my son & my husband ”</p Read More

Name: Sophie Whippy
Age: 31
Occupation: Yoga Teacher & Studio owner at Stretch, Doula / Antenatal Educator at Doula London
Currently living in: London

What makes you happy?

I would be a rubbish mum & wife if I didn’t say my son & my husband ”</p Read More


Photo by Felix Adler

Age: 28
Occupation: Content manager at ferm LIVING and publisher & founder of Nord Verlag.
Currently living in: Copenhagen

What makes you happy?

I get excited easily. By the careless bike ride to work with a few red lights, curling up in bed at night, and the first time it’s warm enough to sleep with an open window. When my boyfriend cooks me pasta with double cream or hearing a favourite song playing on the radio.

Where do you find inspiration?

For several years, I’ve tried to be one of those who got inspired by staring out the window or going for  a walk in the forest. But I’ve learned to cope with the fact that I grew up with and on asphalt, and although I like nature, I’m never going to achieve that picture-perfect image of classic inspiration. But I love the internet. It’s cheesy, it’s superficial, and more often than not cruel and brutal. Yet, at the same time filled with everything your heart desires – and to top it off, it’s the shortest way between two people. I can’t count the number of friends I’ve made through the Internet, that I probably never would have met without, and how wonderful is that?

When did you realise that you were going to start Nord Verlag?

I never had much time to consider it; today it really feels like I just did it, so I guess you could say that I’m still trying to grasp the fact that it’s here and that the platform, outlet, contribution, I’ve always wanted exists.

How do you begin a new project?

I’m a big mess in all things organisational. I’ve downloaded a thousand apps to help me organise thoughts, ideas, and deadlines, but I never use them. I buy fancy notebooks and decide “this time, it’s going to be different”. But it never is. But I guess, at the end of the day, I like it that way. The creative chaos on my dining table turned workplace, turned bookcase, turned… But as with most projects, every project starts with a lot (!) of emailing back and forth. And then a while after that, you’re done. Sometimes I even forget there’s something in between emails.

Where’s your favourite place to work from?

My favourite place is anywhere I find two available minutes. I have a full-time job on the side, which means that everything else is either early in the morning or late at night. I had a plan to not work from home to at least create the illusion of having time off but going to a café or library after work rarely feels very appealing after a long day at work, so usually I end up at my dining table anyway. The good thing is that publishing books is a lot about emailing, so I also get a lot done on my phone when I’m waiting in line or in other of those free time slots during a day.

Describe a normal workday.

Recently, I started working full time with content management at ferm LIVING, which means that now I get up and go to work like everyone else from 9-5. It’s the first time since I graduated that I’ve had a full-time job and had you asked me then, I would have never thought it possible. I was certain that I would live one of those insecure lives with no insurance, pension or paid leave. But as everything is quite new, I’m still trying to figure out how to keep the lives of the books alive on the side. I’m a big fan of systems and I think finding the ideal routine will solve everything. But until then, a day hopefully looks like work, yoga, a bit more work and time at night to have a glass of wine or read a book. It may be naïve of me to think that there can be time for everything in one day but I’m going to give it a go.

Describe an experience you had, that confirmed you, why you are doing what you do.

I have a lot of those currently. I’m an incredibly impatient person, so it took a lot of getting used to the fact that the book business is a slow one. But these days, I’ve received such lovely feedback from the people who’ve read the books, I’ve published. And even if they’d just been moved by a single one, I would say it was worth it. I really have been so overwhelmed by kind comments, positive emails and Instagram likes. They make you forget all the emails that you’ll never get a reply on or all the things that could’ve turned out better.

Name one person who helped you get to where you are today.

I’m not a fan of cheesy romance, but I have to say my boyfriend, Lars. Not only was he the one to turn my entire life into a half Danish, half German one, nor just the one who helps to proofread, connecting me with people who can help, not to mention the fact that he translated the first book at Nord Verlag. And it’s also not just because he does the cooking. But mainly it’s the fact that nothing gets him down. No matter what he always believes that everything is going to be alright. And even though that pisses me even more off when I’m upset about something and just want to be mad, I’m pretty sure I would have given up several times by now without him.

What does art mean to you?

It means a lot, obviously. But in terms of literature, which is the leading art form in my life, if you could talk of a such, I think the expression is the most important thing. I take a snapshot with my phone every time I come across a beautiful sentence. I rarely look at it again, but I like the feeling of keeping it. Also, when I’m writing myself, I spend a lot of time looking at images. I think it’s the quickest way of changing or finding a mood, which is an essential thing of what I do as a copywriter.

Name one women who inspired you on your creative journey?

I’m deeply inspired by every one of the amazing women I meet who dare. It doesn’t matter what they dare to do, but just the fact that they find the courage to go their own way, even when it’s difficult or what they want is the opposite of what they’re expected to do. But if I have to name names, I’m really in awe of what Ricarda Messner is up to, publishing her heart out from Berlin. She founded and created the Flaneur Magazin, which I love. On the same note, I’ve to mention Agnese Kleina, the publisher and founder of the Latvian magazine Benji Knewman. I’ve followed her for a while but was so lucky to get the chance of meeting her this year, and she’s nothing short of amazing. I guess I have a thing for women who do print, and as the scene of indie magazines is booming right now, it’s impossible to name just one.

Which challenges have you met in your work?

Generally, I think I’ve to a great extent underestimated the business I was getting into. Paper, books, and poetry as my first two books are, is not in any way a lucrative business from day 1, nor is it easy getting fast anywhere. And I think that’s my biggest challenge, the pace of it all. I’m in no way a patient person, and I don’t like waiting for things. I want everything, and I want it now. But still, I consider the fact that I underestimated it a big asset: I’m sure, I would’ve never have done it, had I known what I was getting into, and today, standing in the midst of it with books everywhere in my home, I couldn’t imagine not having done it.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

The same advice I give my present self: Relax, it’s going to be alright. I’ve always had the feeling that everything I did was so important, and if I failed it was the end of the world. Now I know that not that many will notice the mistakes of just one person, and that you get better with every mistake. But it’s still hard for me to accept that sometimes you just can’t get it right on your first attempt.

Check out Nord-Verlag here and Camilla’s own profiles here and here.

Read More

Photo by Felix Adler

Age: 28
Occupation: Content manager at ferm LIVING and publisher & founder of Nord Verlag.
Currently living in: Copenhagen

What makes you happy?

I get excited easily. By the careless bike ride to work with a few red lights, curling up in bed at night, and the first time it’s warm enough to sleep with an open window. When my boyfriend cooks me pasta with double cream or hearing a favourite song playing on the radio.

Where do you find inspiration?

For several years, I’ve tried to be one of those who got inspired by staring out the window or going for  a walk in the forest. But I’ve learned to cope with the fact that I grew up with and on asphalt, and although I like nature, I’m never going to achieve that picture-perfect image of classic inspiration. But I love the internet. It’s cheesy, it’s superficial, and more often than not cruel and brutal. Yet, at the same time filled with everything your heart desires – and to top it off, it’s the shortest way between two people. I can’t count the number of friends I’ve made through the Internet, that I probably never would have met without, and how wonderful is that?

When did you realise that you were going to start Nord Verlag?

I never had much time to consider it; today it really feels like I just did it, so I guess you could say that I’m still trying to grasp the fact that it’s here and that the platform, outlet, contribution, I’ve always wanted exists.

How do you begin a new project?

I’m a big mess in all things organisational. I’ve downloaded a thousand apps to help me organise thoughts, ideas, and deadlines, but I never use them. I buy fancy notebooks and decide “this time, it’s going to be different”. But it never is. But I guess, at the end of the day, I like it that way. The creative chaos on my dining table turned workplace, turned bookcase, turned… But as with most projects, every project starts with a lot (!) of emailing back and forth. And then a while after that, you’re done. Sometimes I even forget there’s something in between emails.

Where’s your favourite place to work from?

My favourite place is anywhere I find two available minutes. I have a full-time job on the side, which means that everything else is either early in the morning or late at night. I had a plan to not work from home to at least create the illusion of having time off but going to a café or library after work rarely feels very appealing after a long day at work, so usually I end up at my dining table anyway. The good thing is that publishing books is a lot about emailing, so I also get a lot done on my phone when I’m waiting in line or in other of those free time slots during a day.

Describe a normal workday.

Recently, I started working full time with content management at ferm LIVING, which means that now I get up and go to work like everyone else from 9-5. It’s the first time since I graduated that I’ve had a full-time job and had you asked me then, I would have never thought it possible. I was certain that I would live one of those insecure lives with no insurance, pension or paid leave. But as everything is quite new, I’m still trying to figure out how to keep the lives of the books alive on the side. I’m a big fan of systems and I think finding the ideal routine will solve everything. But until then, a day hopefully looks like work, yoga, a bit more work and time at night to have a glass of wine or read a book. It may be naïve of me to think that there can be time for everything in one day but I’m going to give it a go.

Describe an experience you had, that confirmed you, why you are doing what you do.

I have a lot of those currently. I’m an incredibly impatient person, so it took a lot of getting used to the fact that the book business is a slow one. But these days, I’ve received such lovely feedback from the people who’ve read the books, I’ve published. And even if they’d just been moved by a single one, I would say it was worth it. I really have been so overwhelmed by kind comments, positive emails and Instagram likes. They make you forget all the emails that you’ll never get a reply on or all the things that could’ve turned out better.

Name one person who helped you get to where you are today.

I’m not a fan of cheesy romance, but I have to say my boyfriend, Lars. Not only was he the one to turn my entire life into a half Danish, half German one, nor just the one who helps to proofread, connecting me with people who can help, not to mention the fact that he translated the first book at Nord Verlag. And it’s also not just because he does the cooking. But mainly it’s the fact that nothing gets him down. No matter what he always believes that everything is going to be alright. And even though that pisses me even more off when I’m upset about something and just want to be mad, I’m pretty sure I would have given up several times by now without him.

What does art mean to you?

It means a lot, obviously. But in terms of literature, which is the leading art form in my life, if you could talk of a such, I think the expression is the most important thing. I take a snapshot with my phone every time I come across a beautiful sentence. I rarely look at it again, but I like the feeling of keeping it. Also, when I’m writing myself, I spend a lot of time looking at images. I think it’s the quickest way of changing or finding a mood, which is an essential thing of what I do as a copywriter.

Name one women who inspired you on your creative journey?

I’m deeply inspired by every one of the amazing women I meet who dare. It doesn’t matter what they dare to do, but just the fact that they find the courage to go their own way, even when it’s difficult or what they want is the opposite of what they’re expected to do. But if I have to name names, I’m really in awe of what Ricarda Messner is up to, publishing her heart out from Berlin. She founded and created the Flaneur Magazin, which I love. On the same note, I’ve to mention Agnese Kleina, the publisher and founder of the Latvian magazine Benji Knewman. I’ve followed her for a while but was so lucky to get the chance of meeting her this year, and she’s nothing short of amazing. I guess I have a thing for women who do print, and as the scene of indie magazines is booming right now, it’s impossible to name just one.

Which challenges have you met in your work?

Generally, I think I’ve to a great extent underestimated the business I was getting into. Paper, books, and poetry as my first two books are, is not in any way a lucrative business from day 1, nor is it easy getting fast anywhere. And I think that’s my biggest challenge, the pace of it all. I’m in no way a patient person, and I don’t like waiting for things. I want everything, and I want it now. But still, I consider the fact that I underestimated it a big asset: I’m sure, I would’ve never have done it, had I known what I was getting into, and today, standing in the midst of it with books everywhere in my home, I couldn’t imagine not having done it.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

The same advice I give my present self: Relax, it’s going to be alright. I’ve always had the feeling that everything I did was so important, and if I failed it was the end of the world. Now I know that not that many will notice the mistakes of just one person, and that you get better with every mistake. But it’s still hard for me to accept that sometimes you just can’t get it right on your first attempt.

Check out Nord-Verlag here and Camilla’s own profiles here and here.

Read More