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Name: Sophie Whippy
Age: 31
Occupation: Yoga Teacher & Studio owner at Stretch, Doula / Antenatal Educator at Doula London
Currently living in: London

What makes you happy?

I would be a rubbish mum & wife if I didn’t say my son & my husband ”</p Read More

Name: Sophie Whippy
Age: 31
Occupation: Yoga Teacher & Studio owner at Stretch, Doula / Antenatal Educator at Doula London
Currently living in: London

What makes you happy?

I would be a rubbish mum & wife if I didn’t say my son & my husband ”</p Read More


Photo by Felix Adler

Age: 28
Occupation: Content manager at ferm LIVING and publisher & founder of Nord Verlag.
Currently living in: Copenhagen

What makes you happy?

I get excited easily. By the careless bike ride to work with a few red lights, curling up in bed at night, and the first time it’s warm enough to sleep with an open window. When my boyfriend cooks me pasta with double cream or hearing a favourite song playing on the radio.

Where do you find inspiration?

For several years, I’ve tried to be one of those who got inspired by staring out the window or going for  a walk in the forest. But I’ve learned to cope with the fact that I grew up with and on asphalt, and although I like nature, I’m never going to achieve that picture-perfect image of classic inspiration. But I love the internet. It’s cheesy, it’s superficial, and more often than not cruel and brutal. Yet, at the same time filled with everything your heart desires – and to top it off, it’s the shortest way between two people. I can’t count the number of friends I’ve made through the Internet, that I probably never would have met without, and how wonderful is that?

When did you realise that you were going to start Nord Verlag?

I never had much time to consider it; today it really feels like I just did it, so I guess you could say that I’m still trying to grasp the fact that it’s here and that the platform, outlet, contribution, I’ve always wanted exists.

How do you begin a new project?

I’m a big mess in all things organisational. I’ve downloaded a thousand apps to help me organise thoughts, ideas, and deadlines, but I never use them. I buy fancy notebooks and decide “this time, it’s going to be different”. But it never is. But I guess, at the end of the day, I like it that way. The creative chaos on my dining table turned workplace, turned bookcase, turned… But as with most projects, every project starts with a lot (!) of emailing back and forth. And then a while after that, you’re done. Sometimes I even forget there’s something in between emails.

Where’s your favourite place to work from?

My favourite place is anywhere I find two available minutes. I have a full-time job on the side, which means that everything else is either early in the morning or late at night. I had a plan to not work from home to at least create the illusion of having time off but going to a café or library after work rarely feels very appealing after a long day at work, so usually I end up at my dining table anyway. The good thing is that publishing books is a lot about emailing, so I also get a lot done on my phone when I’m waiting in line or in other of those free time slots during a day.

Describe a normal workday.

Recently, I started working full time with content management at ferm LIVING, which means that now I get up and go to work like everyone else from 9-5. It’s the first time since I graduated that I’ve had a full-time job and had you asked me then, I would have never thought it possible. I was certain that I would live one of those insecure lives with no insurance, pension or paid leave. But as everything is quite new, I’m still trying to figure out how to keep the lives of the books alive on the side. I’m a big fan of systems and I think finding the ideal routine will solve everything. But until then, a day hopefully looks like work, yoga, a bit more work and time at night to have a glass of wine or read a book. It may be naïve of me to think that there can be time for everything in one day but I’m going to give it a go.

Describe an experience you had, that confirmed you, why you are doing what you do.

I have a lot of those currently. I’m an incredibly impatient person, so it took a lot of getting used to the fact that the book business is a slow one. But these days, I’ve received such lovely feedback from the people who’ve read the books, I’ve published. And even if they’d just been moved by a single one, I would say it was worth it. I really have been so overwhelmed by kind comments, positive emails and Instagram likes. They make you forget all the emails that you’ll never get a reply on or all the things that could’ve turned out better.

Name one person who helped you get to where you are today.

I’m not a fan of cheesy romance, but I have to say my boyfriend, Lars. Not only was he the one to turn my entire life into a half Danish, half German one, nor just the one who helps to proofread, connecting me with people who can help, not to mention the fact that he translated the first book at Nord Verlag. And it’s also not just because he does the cooking. But mainly it’s the fact that nothing gets him down. No matter what he always believes that everything is going to be alright. And even though that pisses me even more off when I’m upset about something and just want to be mad, I’m pretty sure I would have given up several times by now without him.

What does art mean to you?

It means a lot, obviously. But in terms of literature, which is the leading art form in my life, if you could talk of a such, I think the expression is the most important thing. I take a snapshot with my phone every time I come across a beautiful sentence. I rarely look at it again, but I like the feeling of keeping it. Also, when I’m writing myself, I spend a lot of time looking at images. I think it’s the quickest way of changing or finding a mood, which is an essential thing of what I do as a copywriter.

Name one women who inspired you on your creative journey?

I’m deeply inspired by every one of the amazing women I meet who dare. It doesn’t matter what they dare to do, but just the fact that they find the courage to go their own way, even when it’s difficult or what they want is the opposite of what they’re expected to do. But if I have to name names, I’m really in awe of what Ricarda Messner is up to, publishing her heart out from Berlin. She founded and created the Flaneur Magazin, which I love. On the same note, I’ve to mention Agnese Kleina, the publisher and founder of the Latvian magazine Benji Knewman. I’ve followed her for a while but was so lucky to get the chance of meeting her this year, and she’s nothing short of amazing. I guess I have a thing for women who do print, and as the scene of indie magazines is booming right now, it’s impossible to name just one.

Which challenges have you met in your work?

Generally, I think I’ve to a great extent underestimated the business I was getting into. Paper, books, and poetry as my first two books are, is not in any way a lucrative business from day 1, nor is it easy getting fast anywhere. And I think that’s my biggest challenge, the pace of it all. I’m in no way a patient person, and I don’t like waiting for things. I want everything, and I want it now. But still, I consider the fact that I underestimated it a big asset: I’m sure, I would’ve never have done it, had I known what I was getting into, and today, standing in the midst of it with books everywhere in my home, I couldn’t imagine not having done it.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

The same advice I give my present self: Relax, it’s going to be alright. I’ve always had the feeling that everything I did was so important, and if I failed it was the end of the world. Now I know that not that many will notice the mistakes of just one person, and that you get better with every mistake. But it’s still hard for me to accept that sometimes you just can’t get it right on your first attempt.

Check out Nord-Verlag here and Camilla’s own profiles here and here.

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Photo by Felix Adler

Age: 28
Occupation: Content manager at ferm LIVING and publisher & founder of Nord Verlag.
Currently living in: Copenhagen

What makes you happy?

I get excited easily. By the careless bike ride to work with a few red lights, curling up in bed at night, and the first time it’s warm enough to sleep with an open window. When my boyfriend cooks me pasta with double cream or hearing a favourite song playing on the radio.

Where do you find inspiration?

For several years, I’ve tried to be one of those who got inspired by staring out the window or going for  a walk in the forest. But I’ve learned to cope with the fact that I grew up with and on asphalt, and although I like nature, I’m never going to achieve that picture-perfect image of classic inspiration. But I love the internet. It’s cheesy, it’s superficial, and more often than not cruel and brutal. Yet, at the same time filled with everything your heart desires – and to top it off, it’s the shortest way between two people. I can’t count the number of friends I’ve made through the Internet, that I probably never would have met without, and how wonderful is that?

When did you realise that you were going to start Nord Verlag?

I never had much time to consider it; today it really feels like I just did it, so I guess you could say that I’m still trying to grasp the fact that it’s here and that the platform, outlet, contribution, I’ve always wanted exists.

How do you begin a new project?

I’m a big mess in all things organisational. I’ve downloaded a thousand apps to help me organise thoughts, ideas, and deadlines, but I never use them. I buy fancy notebooks and decide “this time, it’s going to be different”. But it never is. But I guess, at the end of the day, I like it that way. The creative chaos on my dining table turned workplace, turned bookcase, turned… But as with most projects, every project starts with a lot (!) of emailing back and forth. And then a while after that, you’re done. Sometimes I even forget there’s something in between emails.

Where’s your favourite place to work from?

My favourite place is anywhere I find two available minutes. I have a full-time job on the side, which means that everything else is either early in the morning or late at night. I had a plan to not work from home to at least create the illusion of having time off but going to a café or library after work rarely feels very appealing after a long day at work, so usually I end up at my dining table anyway. The good thing is that publishing books is a lot about emailing, so I also get a lot done on my phone when I’m waiting in line or in other of those free time slots during a day.

Describe a normal workday.

Recently, I started working full time with content management at ferm LIVING, which means that now I get up and go to work like everyone else from 9-5. It’s the first time since I graduated that I’ve had a full-time job and had you asked me then, I would have never thought it possible. I was certain that I would live one of those insecure lives with no insurance, pension or paid leave. But as everything is quite new, I’m still trying to figure out how to keep the lives of the books alive on the side. I’m a big fan of systems and I think finding the ideal routine will solve everything. But until then, a day hopefully looks like work, yoga, a bit more work and time at night to have a glass of wine or read a book. It may be naïve of me to think that there can be time for everything in one day but I’m going to give it a go.

Describe an experience you had, that confirmed you, why you are doing what you do.

I have a lot of those currently. I’m an incredibly impatient person, so it took a lot of getting used to the fact that the book business is a slow one. But these days, I’ve received such lovely feedback from the people who’ve read the books, I’ve published. And even if they’d just been moved by a single one, I would say it was worth it. I really have been so overwhelmed by kind comments, positive emails and Instagram likes. They make you forget all the emails that you’ll never get a reply on or all the things that could’ve turned out better.

Name one person who helped you get to where you are today.

I’m not a fan of cheesy romance, but I have to say my boyfriend, Lars. Not only was he the one to turn my entire life into a half Danish, half German one, nor just the one who helps to proofread, connecting me with people who can help, not to mention the fact that he translated the first book at Nord Verlag. And it’s also not just because he does the cooking. But mainly it’s the fact that nothing gets him down. No matter what he always believes that everything is going to be alright. And even though that pisses me even more off when I’m upset about something and just want to be mad, I’m pretty sure I would have given up several times by now without him.

What does art mean to you?

It means a lot, obviously. But in terms of literature, which is the leading art form in my life, if you could talk of a such, I think the expression is the most important thing. I take a snapshot with my phone every time I come across a beautiful sentence. I rarely look at it again, but I like the feeling of keeping it. Also, when I’m writing myself, I spend a lot of time looking at images. I think it’s the quickest way of changing or finding a mood, which is an essential thing of what I do as a copywriter.

Name one women who inspired you on your creative journey?

I’m deeply inspired by every one of the amazing women I meet who dare. It doesn’t matter what they dare to do, but just the fact that they find the courage to go their own way, even when it’s difficult or what they want is the opposite of what they’re expected to do. But if I have to name names, I’m really in awe of what Ricarda Messner is up to, publishing her heart out from Berlin. She founded and created the Flaneur Magazin, which I love. On the same note, I’ve to mention Agnese Kleina, the publisher and founder of the Latvian magazine Benji Knewman. I’ve followed her for a while but was so lucky to get the chance of meeting her this year, and she’s nothing short of amazing. I guess I have a thing for women who do print, and as the scene of indie magazines is booming right now, it’s impossible to name just one.

Which challenges have you met in your work?

Generally, I think I’ve to a great extent underestimated the business I was getting into. Paper, books, and poetry as my first two books are, is not in any way a lucrative business from day 1, nor is it easy getting fast anywhere. And I think that’s my biggest challenge, the pace of it all. I’m in no way a patient person, and I don’t like waiting for things. I want everything, and I want it now. But still, I consider the fact that I underestimated it a big asset: I’m sure, I would’ve never have done it, had I known what I was getting into, and today, standing in the midst of it with books everywhere in my home, I couldn’t imagine not having done it.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

The same advice I give my present self: Relax, it’s going to be alright. I’ve always had the feeling that everything I did was so important, and if I failed it was the end of the world. Now I know that not that many will notice the mistakes of just one person, and that you get better with every mistake. But it’s still hard for me to accept that sometimes you just can’t get it right on your first attempt.

Check out Nord-Verlag here and Camilla’s own profiles here and here.

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Name: Emily Gernild
Age: 32
Occupation: Visual Artist
Currently living in: Copenhagen

What makes you happy?

When I’m fully present with whatever I do. Painting. Or being with my family.

Where do you find inspiration?

Exhibitions at galleries and museums, making studio visits with other artists, my surroundings in the city, a bike ride to Glostrup, or making collaborations and trying out new materials.

When did you realise that you were going to be an artist?

When I was about 23 years old, I had a boyfriend who thought I would fit right into the art academy. He had already finished his time at the Danish Design School and was a great supporter of me trying it out.

How do you begin a new project?

I show up in the studio in the morning. Sometimes I have inspiration with me, other times I don’t. I clean my place, make coffee and start drawing until I have the right idea, or an urge to use a certain colour combination.

Where’s your favourite place to work from?

My studio.

Describe an experience you had, that confirmed you, why you are doing what you do.

I was once asked to make a painting pro bono. It was for a memorial concert and an auction to be held in memory of a young man who had died violently. The money to be raised, supported a good and peaceful cause in his name. I was trying to capture a person that I had never met in that painting. I only had the stories about him and firsthand descriptions from friends and family. That was a profound experience. Everybody involved was obviously very emotional and personally involved in the project. I felt that art in that sorrowful context, was a way to express the complex emotions, which the spoken word struggles to describe.

Name one person who helped you get to where you are today.

My old professor Jens Haaning helped me get in touch with a professor at Kunstakademie Düsseldorf and made it possible for me to study there for a year. Jens Haaning still plays a big role in my way of working, and along the way he has been my greatest supporter and encouraged me to continue doing what I had started doing at the academy. Also, I feel like I have been blessed to meet so many supporting and great people along the way of my short career.

What does art mean to you?

To me it’s a way of thinking and offers a poetic, abstract, spiritual and nuanced method to discuss and reflect.

Name one women who inspired you on your creative journey?

I don’t consider myself creative necessarily. I just use what works best for me to put light on important issues, or as a way to raise my non-verbal voice in a verbalised world. But I definitely consider Agnes Martin and her writings on paintings and beauty as being one of my biggest sources of inspiration.

Which challenges have you met in your work?

The biggest challenge is when I have to make decisions on my own. It’s a one woman project. Even if I discuss challenges with my manager, boyfriend or business partner, in the end it’s up to me alone how I want things to be.

What advice would you give to an aspiring artist?

Work hard. Say NO to projects that don’t have the right spirit. If it’s too commercial too soon, think twice. My professor gave me a great advise: “Rather exhibit off space than in a shitty gallery. AND always thank people who spent time on you and show interest in your work.”

See more of Emily’s work here.

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Gunta Stölzl was a German textile artist who played a fundamental role in the development of the Bauhaus school’s weaving workshop. Gunta created immense change within the textile field by uniting art practices taught at Bauhaus with traditional textile techniques and became the first woman Master at the school. Under her direction, Bauhaus Weaving Workshop became one of its most successful facilities.









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Gunta Stölzl was a German textile artist who played a fundamental role in the development of the Bauhaus school’s weaving workshop. Gunta created immense change within the textile field by uniting art practices taught at Bauhaus with traditional textile techniques and became the first woman Master at the school. Under her direction, Bauhaus Weaving Workshop became one of its most successful facilities.









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Photo by Freya McOmish

Name: Rebecca Thandi Norman
Age: 31
Occupation: Editor-in-Chief & co-founder, Scandinavia Standard
Currently living in: Copenhagen

What makes you happy?

Spending time with my family, writing, reading, when the business is doing well, travel, flowers.

Where do you find inspiration?

I find inspiration both in visuals and in text. I do a lot of reading, and try to really vary the genres I’m reading; graphic novels and comic books are hugely inspiring to me. Visually, I find light inspiring, especially since moving to Denmark. The morning light in my apartment is something that gets me moving.

When did you realise that you were going to move to Copenhagen?

Well, the first time I moved to Copenhagen was back in 2008 when I did a study exchange for six months. But as for moving permanently? After my husband and I bought our apartment in 2013, I think! Before putting down roots in Copenhagen, I grew up in Boston and then lived in both London and Cape Town. The original plan after graduating from my Master’s Degree at the University of Copenhagen was to move back to Cape Town with my husband. Then a series of events unfolded that kept us in Copenhagen. It wasn’t expected, but I feel so happy to be here.

When did you realise that you were going to start Scandinavia Standard?

I met my co-founder, Freya McOmish (she is the Creative Director), around May 2013. I had just graduated with my Master’s in Public Health, then gotten married, and settled in Copenhagen. I had a teaching job lined up for September, but I was waiting for my visa to come through so I had this four month period where I wasn’t allowed to work. When Freya began talking about this project she had always wanted to start, but hadn’t gotten around to, I thought it was genius. It was something I felt people needed in Scandinavia; something I had definitely needed when I moved there for the first time. So I called her the next day and we started right away. It felt real when the website went live, which was in September of 2013.

How do you begin a new project?

Within Scandinavia Standard, starting new projects is really exciting! Freya and I spend a lot of time strategising and figuring out the logistics of new projects, so when we launch something the workflow can be as smooth as possible. At any given time, we have multiple projects going on.

Our biggest project to date has been our Scandinavian travel app, which we released at the beginning of June 2018. It has over 500 locations throughout the Scandinavian capitals; map and itinerary-integrated functionality, original photos…it was a massive undertaking and I’m so happy it’s out there in the world now!

As for my own projects, I wish I had more time to do side projects. I do a bit of personal writing, sketching, and various art projects. I recently did a flower dye workshop with an amazing company in Copenhagen called Marble Matter. It’s more about exercising those creative muscles than anything else.

Where’s your favourite place to work from?

My office in Nordvest. But every now and then it’s nice to work from a different space, like a library, cafe, or my desk at home. A change of space can be helpful in getting rid of distractions or mental blocks.

Describe a normal workday.

I’m in the office at 8:30 and make a pot of coffee (necessary). I respond to emails and take care of admin for approximately 2 hours, then dive into the editorial calendar. By midday I finish up with editorial content, have a quick lunch, and then it’s time for projects.

I have to leave the office at 3:00 in order to pick up my son by 3:30. Then I spend the afternoon with him; we usually to the playground or the library. My husband gets home around 5:30 and we all have dinner together. When my son goes to bed at 7, I work for a few hours if needed. It’s also important to spend time with my husband and relax, so it’s just a matter of what’s possible on a given day.

Describe an experience you had, that confirmed you, why you are doing what you do.

Every day confirms for me that we’re on the right track. When I get emails from people saying that the site has really helped them feel at home in a new city, or keeps them inspired daily, that’s what is most important to me.

We recently took a trip to Stockholm to have meetings about a big upcoming project and had quite an incredible experience with a woman who had previously run a similar project. If I believed in signs, this would have been one. Moments like those aren’t what keep me working day-to-day, but they can be reinvigorating.

Name one person who helped you get to where you are today.

The person who has been the biggest help, of course, is my co-founder Freya. We wouldn’t be where we are without our teamwork and our complementary skills. We hold each other accountable day-to-day.

The thing about running a business is that there is a huge list of people who make it possible, so I can’t just name one person. Everyone from our accountant to our landlord to the fellow creatives we’ve worked with along the way have had some role in the process. And then of course there are the people outside of the industry who personally hold me up, like my husband and family and friends. It goes deep.

What does art mean to you?

Art can be so many things. Sometimes it’s just beauty; something that just takes my breath away. Often art makes me think about the context it was created in, or about how a piece relates to the category of art itself, or the social message of the piece. An artist whose work I admire, and who combines so many of those factors, is Toyin Ojih Odutola. She’s a Nigerian visual artist working in NYC.

I think it’s important to see the art in every day. The clothes and jewellery you wear, or the way you decorate your home, or an arrangement of flowers. Those things aren’t necessarily art, but they can have art in them.

Name one women who inspired you on your creative journey?

Oh wow, so many! I cannot name just one. In terms of my foundation, my mom and grandmothers have been huge influences on my creative thinking. Both of my grandmothers are incredibly artful in their daily lives.

A woman who has been hugely inspirational to me is Elaine Welteroth, the former Editor-in-Chief at Teen Vogue. She turned what used to be a fairly tame fashion publication into a politically aware magazine that took teenagers seriously. She understood that visual markers like fashion can be can be used in powerful ways, but also that it’s okay to both be socially engaged and into clothes or other aesthetic things. And equally importantly, she surrounded herself with incredibly talented people who also had vision. That is so key.

I also look to contemporary and past editors like Christene Barberich (Refinery29), Edward Enninful (Vogue UK), Sarah Douglas (Wallpaper), Marcia Ann Gillespie (Essence, Ms.) , and Diana Vreeland (Vogue US), as sources of strength and inspiration.

Which challenges have you met in your work?

A challenge at the beginning was getting people to pay us for our work. With digital publishing, there’s a general feeling that because the consumption is (often) free, the production should be too. But that can’t sustain a business, and you have to pay people for their work.

We also often choose to work with small businesses and emerging artists who can’t afford to pay, so we needed to find a way to balance that with working with large brands that do have marketing or production budgets.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

Don’t be afraid to share strong opinions and stand by them. Ask to be paid for your work. Think more about intersectionality and how what you do is connected to the world. End unhealthy relationships or situations early. Saying you were wrong is not a sign of weakness. No one will create boundaries for you, except for you; don’t get mad that others don’t automatically know your needs or boundaries without you telling them first.

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